Ultimate Half Iron by Jonathan Kearsley

Ultimate Half Ironman by Jonathan Kearsley

Before anyone comments about grammar I got CC in English, but writing this on a Portuguese beach with a lot of sangria is making literacy hard at the moment!

As all races should start off I heard thunderstruck on the tannoy, this song being synonymous with iron man. I have listened to this song perhaps a hundred times in training, it always has the same effect, ask Chris Green. Now fully focused give him a big hug and a kiss on the cheek and headed to the lake.

Unlike every session at the Delph it is about 15 degrees and I actually want to be there. 10 minutes to acclimatise to the water, race nerves now fully taken over I try and speak to other competitors and practice my start. I headed to the front between two buoys. Go. I love swimming, it’s my favourite leg of the race, I spend the first 100m in an aquatic fight club a few kicks to the goggles and a swimmer over the top, enough to panic but experience says this is part and parcel of any race, along a wider line I find open water, relax and settle in to my rhythm, singing ac/dc in my head and I completed the first lap, ran along the carpet and dive back in. I’m not making Tom Daley nervous but a decent enough dive to join the lead pack, now all I can think about is my bike! Swimming is easy but cyclists play a game in triathlons called catch the swimmer who shouldn’t be on a bike.

Leaving the water in 7th position In 28 minutes I sprint to transition, the bike course is two laps at 45 km a piece. The first lap of my bike showed me it’s capable of speed and a very shocked me had started to do the math that a good time was on, on the turn for lap 2 a screw came loose on the aero bars, a few choice words later and half an energy bar I pushed on with lap two, losing time and places I finished the bike 51st in 2:48, a reality check in t2 will later tell me to grow up and that I’ve more than exceeded my expectations. My mum before the race suggested to take my time in transitions as it’s not a race, perhaps unusual advice before a race but making the most of the race and the allowance of headphones I put music on got myself organised.

Immediately leaving t2 I bumped into the the race leader about to start his last lap, apologies and an offered lucozade I watched him disappear in the distance, my last half distance was a day to forget mainly due to a 2:36 half marathon. 1 lap in I spot a familiar sight with Lucy Charles Esque battle braids. Seeing Chris made me so happy, I pushed on with the run, waiting for my legs to decide that the race is over and walking would be preferable. Seeing Chris on the following laps was either a blown kiss or a high 5 to the beautiful bastard, he made the run leg look effortless.

The last lap I told myself that if I wanted a time then it’s there but I’m going to have to suffer for it. I ran all the way with a lucozade bottle and after 20km I was sad to bin it truth be told.

1km left I thanked every single person who had been there. I couldn’t recommend this race enough, the support is amazing and definitely helps. The last 500m my pace picked up now at full sprint another runner shouts slow down you’ll not finish, he was told that I’m about to pb by almost a hour and 20 minutes, getting f**king running he screamed, finishing in 5:13 I broke down, 5 mins alone with my hat firmly over my face.

This is my favourite race and would recommend to any triathlete as a go at the longer distance tri.